About valaida

writer. thinker. listener. idea whisperer. traveler. mad word geek. absolute scrabble freak. drinker of life. da*n good friend. ridiculous foodie. imaginative dreamer. afflicted party planner. kind conqueror. okra lover. hillbilly w/ southern roots far-stretched global sights. author of new book that reframes portraits of philanthropy. Giving Back: A Tribute to Generations of African American Philanthropists | http://bit.ly/htLxQU

Treasure

Me, dad, mom and sis

found, on road to Outer Banks,

vaults of inner bliss.

ava wood 

Struggle, Strength and Striving

EIGHTThe number 8 in the Bible represents a new beginning—meaning a new order or creation—and, in general, a numeral rich in symbolism. I’m alert to the fact that last week marked eight years since the idea for Giving Back came as a gift to me while at a conference in Seattle. The Giving Back Project launched that night, if only in my imagination for the first few months. Since April 2007, a lot has occurred. Gully lows. Mountain highs. Jagged trails. Leaps of faith. Dreams realized. Some deferred. And still constant aspiration and so much more to do.

In its eighth year, the Giving Back Project is indeed set to begin again with Giving Back: The Soul of Philanthropy Reframed and Exhibited embarking on a national tour to museums and galleries at public libraries and colleges. In hopes of never forgetting the struggle, strength and striving that delivered me and the project to another new threshold, I’ve posted below the “Author’s Notes” from Giving Back, which I wrote while filled with gratitude just before the book was published.


Author’s Notes from Giving Back

Grace is a gift always welcome. And I was showered with grace while developing Giving Back. When I first conceived of the idea, zeal and naivety blinded me to its magnitude. I thought it would take a year to develop the book; instead it led me on a four-and- a-half-year odyssey that proved both torturous and joyous.

At times, doubts would swarm with stinging questions about whether the vision was attainable. I questioned whether I was up to the sacrifices and risks that seeing it through seemed to require of me. People I spoke with believed in the project; they saw the significance of documenting authentic stories and producing a socially relevant book. This helped fend off some of my fears. Even with dispiriting episodes, I could never suppress for long the call of these stories.

Interviewing people was a privilege and extraordinarily gratifying; yet the gravity of the undertaking weighed heavily on me too. Each set of interview notes seemed so delicate. I gained deeper recognition of how precious each story was and how potent it could become if I possessed the wherewithal to craft a compelling body of work and get it in front of readers.

I felt like a surrogate entrusted to carry not one but scores of seeds, each exceptional, fragile and bundling possibilities. Humbled and often daunted, I knew I had to take care in crafting each story with due reverence. Demanding equal finesse was clearing an uncertain path to bring the book’s narrative and photographic content out of the obscurity of our families, our communities and my laptop into the light of the wider world. Guidance, often from unexpected people and places, came at each crossroad.

Always brightening the journey were the hopes and confidence expressed by family, friends and giving circle members. I remember the excitement of Ohmar, Renee and Rashad when they first heard my idea while on a road trip to a Black philanthropy conference. I think about Aunt Dora’s smile upon learning she inspired the book. I recall early conversations with Charles about my vision and the alignment of our artistic aspirations. Collaboration with Charles has been a God-sent steadying force, from his initial blind faith in the project to his ease, professionalism and quiet generosity.

The most beautiful gift while writing this book was being immersed in its content. I couldn’t help but become re-inspired when each day required me to delve into literally hundreds of narratives and photographs meant to inspire and motivate —I call it chicken and dumplings for the giver’s soul. Gratitude bubbles over when I look back on the gracious acts that brought Giving Back into being. Without a doubt God’s grace is greatest, but grace granted by the people around me was wonderfully sweet too.

— VF


And ye shall sow the eighth year, and eat yet of old fruit until the ninth year; until her fruits come in ye shall eat of the old store.  Leviticus 25:22

Bursting

Witness God’s green work

Entrust your seed to the earth

Bloom, bloom, blossom burst

— ava wood

 

 

A Most Cherished Gift

luminaries2 at JCSU_Feb 20 2015

of all things to give
among the most cherished gifts
is simply a chance

— ava wood

luminaries at JCSU_Feb 20 2015

scenes from a pdg, hbd

last month’s nomadic wandering led to a pretty da*n good and happy birthday. actually, it was a celebratory week that took me from the south carolina coast to the hills of north carolina’s wine country.

Seeing Through An Altered Lens

Video Still_Exhibit

We not only alter the lens on philanthropy, we also amplify Black voices in a myriad of ways. Here’s a link to the latest Giving Back Project (GBP) e-blast, with highlights, pics and video on our new touring exhibit: Watch Us Amplify The Soul of Philanthropy

Almost three years ago, we produced our first GBP video [ philanthropy reframed ] to alter and amplify voices, views and vibes. Happy to see that video surpass 3000 views this week!

GBP is based on the premise that the people comprising our communities and philanthropic institutions would benefit, immensely, by changing the scope of how we all see ourselves and by listening to understand, more often and far better.

— VF

‘Stick To Love’

“I have decided to stick to love…Hate is too great a burden to bear.”

Martin Luther King, Jr. 

IMG_0444

‘LOVE Wall’ of The Soul of Philanthropy exhibition at JCSU

Remembering that Dr. King was assassinated April 4, 1968 and striving to sustain his legacy 47 years later through our work on Giving Back: The Soul of Philanthropy Reframed and Exhibited.

‘Someone Gave 4 Me’

I give back because1

“LOVE wall” pic from The Soul of Philanthropy exhibit at JCSU.

#getyourgiveon

Another NEW View, Vibe, Voice and Video on Philanthropy

TheSoulofPhilanthropy.com

#getyourgiveon

 

 

Can You Afford Not To?

IMG_0482

A photograph from the outdoor element of “The Soul of Philanthropy” exhibit at JCSU.

Love this!

— VF