‘Commendable but…’

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Today the world remembers and praises the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on the 50th anniversary of his assassination.

Every exhibition of  The Soul of Philanthropy features his words prominently to keep bright the flame of justice and love and to guide our paths toward the beloved community.

The Atlanta exhibition earlier this year provided an extraordinary opportunity to feel the potency of his legacy and our collective responsibility to carry the torch forward. Watch the short film below from the exhibit opening at Atlanta’s Auburn Avenue Research Library.

#MLK50Forward

‘Stick To Love’

“I have decided to stick to love…Hate is too great a burden to bear.”

Martin Luther King, Jr. 

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‘LOVE Wall’ of The Soul of Philanthropy exhibition at JCSU

Remembering that Dr. King was assassinated April 4, 1968 and striving to sustain his legacy 47 years later through our work on Giving Back: The Soul of Philanthropy Reframed and Exhibited.

On The Horizon: An August of Dreams and Mountaintops

Black Philanthropy Month 2013 begins this week, and it’s “An August of Dreams and Mountaintops.” Below is content from the media release about BPM 2013.

BPM LOGO (FINAL)Remembering 50 years of historic achievements with calls for greater African-descent giving and community-led change

The month of August has become a momentous time in the global history of the Black giving movement. Entering its third year of observance, Black Philanthropy Month 2013 (BPM 2013) is an unprecedented coordinated initiative to strengthen African-American and African-descent giving in all its forms. High-impact events, media stories, service projects and giving opportunities compose the campaign, which kicks off in August 2013 and continues through February 2014.

BPM SPACE 2“Black Philanthropy Month gives our diverse communities an opportunity to celebrate and renew their rich, shared traditions of giving, self-help and innovation throughout the US and the world,” says Dr. Jackie Copeland-Carson, Executive Director, African Women’s Development Fund USA (AWDF USA).

Coinciding with commemorations of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom and Dr. King’s unforgettable “I Have a Dream” speech, BPM 2013 provides both time for reflection on the state of the “dream” a half-century later and calls for action to address the most pressing challenges of the 21st century. With a base of activities in place, the primary goals of the campaign are to inspire people to improve their communities locally and globally, give back in smarter and more strategic ways and transform people’s lives for the better. Self-organized events, community conversations and charitable fundraising in recognition of BPM 2013 are encouraged.

Events across the country start in August 2013. Special gatherings taking place in cities nationwide include: a summit on Black philanthropy on Martha’s Vineyard; a Northern California benefit in support of improving maternal health in Africa; and a moderated panel discussion in Charlotte commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington while examining the history and possibilities of African-American giving and civic engagement. A regularly updated calendar of events can be found at BlackPhilanthropyMonth.com.

According to Tracey Webb, founder of BlackGivesBack.com, BPM 2013’s media hub, “Combining the power of print, broadcast and digital media will strengthen Black philanthropy’s voice and increase its impact for new times.”

BPM also aims to expand the ways that people give. Fund-raising efforts and community drives to be mounted and publicized in August and beyond include Black Gives Back to SchoolTM (school supplies and clothes); Community Investment Network 2013 National Conference (giving circles and collective giving); and AWDF USA’s Mother Africa Campaign (maternal health).

“We expect to see more people giving in strategic, new ways as well as groups investing in Black philanthropic know-how and leadership, across generations,” says Valaida Fullwood of the Giving Back Project.

“Empowering communities to be the change they wish to see will help shape the philanthropic landscape of the 21st century,” says Chad Jones, Executive Director, Community Investment Network.

Beginning this August, help us renew the commitment of time, voice or money to be a part of Black Philanthropy’s future. Join the campaign to create a diverse global community that Dr. King spoke of, thousands marched for and you can participate in.

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African Women’s Development Fund USA (AWDF USA) provides a vehicle for effective American philanthropy to Africa and builds the capacity of the continent’s women for social change and sustainable development.  Through its research, public information and convening initiatives, it also seeks to highlight the tremendous impact that African women-led philanthropy and nonprofits are having on the lives of their families and communities across the continent and Diaspora.

BlackGivesBack.com (BGB) informs as the premier website on Black philanthropy since 2007, reaching readers in the U.S. and abroad and attracting major media attention. BGB uses original, in-depth and engaging philanthropy-themed story angles, vibrant imagery, features including “The Insider” that profiles African American donors and nonprofit and foundation executives, event coverage, celebrity philanthropy and more.

Community Investment Network (CIN), formed in 2003, invests in cultivating donors of color and giving circles and has emerged a leading national resource that bridges institutional philanthropy and diverse, everyday givers. From developing a new cadre of philanthropic leaders to facilitating learning-centered approaches, CIN empowers its members to give their time, talent, treasure and testimonials to be the change they wish to see.

The Giving Back Project (GBP) inspires by reframing portraits of philanthropy with stories, photography and community conversations. GBP emerged from the work of New Generation of African American Philanthropists (NGAAP-Charlotte) and led to the publication of Giving Back, the award-winning book by Valaida Fullwood that profiles African American giving. GBP ventures to ignite a movement of conscientious philanthropy by empowering a generation to recognize its power and responsibility to give back.

QOTD from MLK

Charles W. Thomas, Jr., photographer

“Pity may represent little more than the impersonal concern which prompts the mailing of a check, but true sympathy is the personal concern which demands the giving of one’s soul.”

— Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.