Praise for Giving Back

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P R A I S E

“This is the most powerful representation of philanthropy that I have seen in more than a decade in this field. The stories, the quotes, the voices and the photographs are uniformly vivid and extraordinary….A reminder that, in its roots, philanthropy should be felt, not thought.”

— Robert K. Ross, M.D., president and CEO, The California Endowment

“Giving Back shines a long overdue spotlight on the legacy of giving which is so much a part of the African American community’s DNA and spirit. Writer Valaida Fullwood and photographer Charles Thomas Jr. have beautifully captured both in words and pictures untold stories of generosity which move and inspire. Giving Back should be positioned in a place of honor on the bookshelf and coffee table of every black family in America.”
— Judy Belk, senior vice president, Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors

“Through a rich tapestry of voices and images, including inspirational interviews, stunning photographs, thoughtful commentary, and wide-ranging quotations, Giving Back captures the essence and generosity of African American donors as never before.  No one—including the leaders of non-profit organizations—could fail to be moved and enlightened by these vivid reminders of the potential of African American philanthropy.

“The book is beautiful and so inspirational, I now know what I will be getting everyone as a Christmas present!”

Michele Minter, vice president for development, The College Board

“Astonishing . . . so beautiful, so deep and yet so inviting.

Giving Back belongs in every American home, not just every home of Americans of African descent. Each page connects the readers and the children they love to generosity that God, the Declaration of Independence and our awe-inspiring Black forebears taught us all.

“A visual triumph. A story that has not been told!”

Claire Gaudiani, Ph.D., author of The Greater Good, Generosity Unbound and Daughters of the Democracy  

“Indescribably powerful presentation in images and words of philanthropists who understood their actions of ‘just trying to lend a hand.’ Engagingly spiritual which will energize readers yet unborn.

“A must have.”

The Reverend Clifford A. Jones, Sr., senior pastor, Friendship Missionary Baptist Church

“Weaving photographs, testimonials and personal stories of Black people from all walks of life, Valaida Fullwood has created a work of art that reveals the essence of philanthropy—which is giving. For centuries, Black women, men and children have been giving in ways that defy traditional definitions of philanthropy.

“Giving Back is a revelation. Readers will be astounded by the breadth and depth of Black philanthropy.”

Deborah Holmes, vice president for communications, Global Fund for Women

Philanthropy. Does that word make you think of some 19th century captain-of-industry sitting in his office, doling out bits of his fortune? This marvelous book will give you a fresh perspective. ‘Giving back’ is rooted deep in African American history. And it’s often done with a community approach, rather than by a lone individual. Charles Thomas’s artful photographs and the inspiring words by Valaida Fullwood and her community of collaborators carry a powerful message:  Philanthropy is something that we all can do.”

Tom Hanchett, Ph.D., staff historian, Levine Museum of the New South and author of Sorting Out The New South

“It’s difficult to capture into words all the emotions I felt as I read through this book.

“Giving Back is simply beautiful. Beautiful through its stories. Beautiful through its photography. Beautiful through the real narratives of generosity and philanthropy. Beautiful through spirituality. Beautiful because of the hope it inspires from our past, for our present and the future.”

Eugene Cho, co-founder and executive director, One Day’s Wages

“You just never know what will generate the spark that transforms a life, a community or a people.  It might be that kind, encouraging word; or maybe ‘a couple of bucks to help you get by;’ how about the time that you spent with me sharing the secrets to your success; or, the scholarship that you gave privately so I could attend summer camp.  You just never know what little thing (or great thing) will provide that inspiration for another to soar to higher heights.

“That message is loud and clear within Giving Back.  It leaps out at you when you read the individual profiles that are provided by sons, daughters, mentees and admirers.  It is prevalent in the responses to the book’s probing questions. Giving Back will be a great read for anyone who has an interest in making a difference!”

Richard “Stick” Williams, president, Duke Energy Foundation

“This book shares the stories of men and women whose philanthropy, big or small, is an indelible part of American history. Through their individual and collective generosity, children were educated, families were strengthened, communities were built and their legacy is a bridge for the next generation. On each page, I recognized—if not by name—the spirit of someone I know and respect. These lessons on the ‘love of humankind’ are universal.”

Deborah J. Richardson, executive vice president, National Center for Civil and Human Rights

Giving Back is a must have book for all!  It brings to life African American giving and highlights philanthropic acts that many of us perform daily without naming it ‘philanthropy.’ The combination of photographs and narrative effectively reframes the dialogue on philanthropy, particularly among the unsung heroes and heroines contributing to daily growth and prosperity in our communities.

“A must have book of our history and a great teaching toolkit!”

Ivye L. Allen, Ph.D., president and CEO, Foundation for the Mid South

“Never again will I frame my conversation on how African Americans give under the guise of ‘Black people give differently—our philanthropy is different because we primarily see giving through our faith.’ We give holistically!

“Valaida Fullwood’s Giving Back captivated me from the cover photo where I connected with the hands—memories of my grandmother’s skin—lined with dreams deferred and the promise of aspirations and achievement. Giving Back is indeed a form of personal engagement as well as deep conversational sharing. It is undeniably the missing formula to the roots of African American philanthropy. Simply stated: Giving Back, through stories of everyday people aided with photography of the moment, is poignant and more of a revelation than any article or research publication on the topic of African American giving.

“Since reading Giving Back, from now on, I will tell my philanthropy story with pride and without excuses or apologies.”

Ruby Bright, executive director, Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis

“Giving Back looks poignantly at the notion of giving. The meticulously edited narrative enlightens us about the idea of caring and sharing communities. From this book, one sees through Thomas’s photographs relationships marked by respect and honor. The text and photographs inform the reader about strength, in multiple perspectives.

“Through the rich photographs—which are full of spirit and beauty both enhanced by the framing of the subjects—we see Thomas’s respectful eye. The book simply tells us that Black people care which is evidenced in the photographs and the narratives. This book is useful for anyone who is interested in philanthropy but also will be appreciated by people who have a love for portrait photography.

“Giving Back is a valuable resource and, in my view, will encourage others to reconsider what it means to give. 

It is a welcomed addition to books promoting this field. I found the idea of the book stimulating, as it is a much overlooked discussion. Fullwood and Thomas assembled a remarkable book that informs and honors. It enables us to imagine through the quotes, as the photographs illuminate and engage us about the pleasure of giving.”

Deborah Willis, Ph.D., NYU professor, author, historian, photographer and 

2000 MacArthur genius award recipient

“Beautiful. Powerful. Poignant. Giving Back is more than a book: It is a gift to each of us given the opportunity to walk this journey through each page, each voice, each story and each photograph. Philanthropy is practiced in many different ways around the world. Giving Back teaches us that philanthropy is practiced in many different ways right here at home—in our history, our present and our future.”

Steve Gunderson, former president and CEO, Council on Foundations

“This book is a must read for all who want a truer and deeper understanding of American philanthropy in particular philanthropy in the Black community. Historical analysis and rich personal stories…it’s all here.”

 Wenda Weekes Moore, trustee, W.K. Kellogg Foundation

“In 2011, The Links, Incorporated celebrates 65 years of giving back to communities across the nation. Our founders believed that as educated and successful African American women, we should do whatever is necessary to serve those of African descent and assist in closing gaps in education and providing support for the underserved. We do this still today, through philanthropic as well as humanitarian services. As authors Fullwood and Thomas expressed in Giving Back, philanthropy has been the thread that held and continues to hold our communities together. The Links, Incorporated strives to become an even greater force, known everywhere for our philanthropic support. Our hope is by giving back, we will play an intricate role in enabling and influencing a positive future for an infinite number of generations.
”

— Margot James Copeland
, National President
, The Links, Incorporated
 and The Links Foundation, Incorporated

Giving Back is a beautiful book that masterfully demonstrates the power of African American giving.  Through riveting photography and engaging vignettes, Valaida Fullwood tells the story of philanthropy at its purest.  Giving Back showcases the diversity in giving that has taken place for centuries and continues to thrive in Black communities.  Anyone interested in philanthropy, Black giving, and African American history and culture will enjoy reading this wonderful new book.”

— Marybeth Gasman, Ph.D., professor, University of Pennsylvania and author of Uplifting a People: African American Philanthropy and Education

“Valaida Fullwood’s Giving Back provides full exposure to the philanthropic treasures we as African Americans have always shared but are rarely credited with in discussions of African American philanthropy. This photographic masterpiece, which certainly tells a story, gives viewers an opportunity to develop their own story as well. What a way to learn!”

— Nelson Bowman, III, director of development, Prairie View A&M University

“Individual giving, organized giving and planned giving are important conversations that need to be elevated in the African-American community like never before and Giving Back is a powerful and beautiful conversation starter.”

— Pat Macdonald, executive director, Black Community Fund, Kansas City, MO

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Recent Posts

Tale of Two Cities

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Atlanta panel discussion during Black Philanthropy Month, leading up to the exhibit’s opening

You’d be hard pressed to find two American cities any more geographically and demographically disparate than Portland, Oregon and Atlanta, Georgia. And yet, one thing they have in common is their commitment to to host the comprehensive, multimedia version of The Soul of Philanthropy. Following the IMLS grant-funded exhibit tour, managed by Johnson C. Smith University during 2015 and 2016, these cities are the first in the country to mount exhibitions and lead civic engagement aimed at reframing philanthropy for greater inclusiveness and lasting impact.

PDX to ATL map

The road from Portland to Atlanta opens a world of possibilities

Vibrant big cities, both Portland and Atlanta benefit from prominent philanthropic families, businesses and foundations. Perhaps then it’s unsurprising that groups in each city would be intrigued by The Soul of Philanthropy, which invites people to see philanthropy differently. That is, come to know that philanthropy is deeper than your pockets.

The Portland exhibition, presented by MRG Foundation at Concordia University, opened at the start of this year and ended late March. The Atlanta exhibition, presented by Hammonds House Museum, is sponsored by the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta and several other groups and individual donors. The exhibition will open at Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History in November 2017. Above is a photo from an early program in Atlanta; below is a photo collage from the Portland exhibition.

 

 

Since the inception of the Giving Back Project in 2007, I, along with Charles Thomas, aimed to create a body of work that would transcend race and place. Charlotte, North Carolina has been the epicenter of the project because that’s where our giving circle is based and where we each live and have formed relationships over the majority of our lives. Even so, we aspired to craft stories and release photography, so soulful and true, they’d resonate broadly and tap deeply at the core of people any and everywhere. I used to say, “I want people in Phoenix to see themselves and people they know in these stories and images.”

Ten years into this project and six years after the first printing of Giving Back, seeing sustained interest in the book nationwide and overseas, too, has been gratifying. Proving relevant and timeless, the book continues to sell steadily and, having again sold out, is presently being printed for the fourth time; over 200 books are now on backorder. It’s truly the book that keeps giving!

When the exhibit was announced in 2014 and opened at Johnson C. Smith University, it also began attracting attention and inquiries from coast to coast, including at the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). Leaders in Portland and Atlanta were among the first to express interest in the exhibit.

Three thousand miles stretch between Portland and Atlanta. The distance between their histories and demographics is wide as well, yet hosting The Soul of Philanthropy bridges these communities. It has provided space for uncommon collaborations, honest conversations and new insights, offering lasting benefit to both places.

Situated in the Pacific Northwest, Portland boasts a hipster reputation as a progressive, socially conscious city, which belies its racist history. Oregon enacted a shameful ban of Black people during periods of the 19th and 20th centuries. Generations later, Portland consequently stands labeled “the Whitest City in America,” because 78 percent of its population identifies racially as White. At seven percent, Black residents comprise a small fraction of the community.

Conversely, Atlanta is a cultural and commercial center of the Atlantic Southeast. A majority of its residents are African American, earning it the reputation of a “Black mecca”. While Oregon forbade Blacks from moving to the state until the 1920s, clear across the country, Georgia depended on the enslavement and exploitation of Black people well into the 20th century. At opposite corners of the U.S., both cities have legacies that can, at times, thwart or even pervert philanthropic efforts today.

The Soul of Philanthropy is a vehicle for communities to explore and celebrate multiple giving traditions, to learn about an array of philanthropic tools and strategies, and to break through barriers to inclusiveness. Even with vast differences in history and population, philanthropic leaders in Portland and in Atlanta have found value in engaging in vital community building through the exhibit. Whether Black, White, Latino, American Indian, Asian American, Middle Easterner, Pacific Islander, or any cultural roots, the stories, photography and themes of The Soul of Philanthropy hold relevance. After a decade, Charles and I have seen firsthand the ways our work persists and sustains significance and resonance in a complicated field and often misunderstood topic.

First Portland and soon Atlanta are reframing portraits of philanthropy and coming to see philanthropy differently. If America’s “Whitest city” and “Black mecca” have found value in this crucial work, there is ample room for cities in between to do the same.

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