Culture Is . . .

Black Philanthropy Month elevates a culture of giving! Read about past and upcoming happenings in Portland (OR), New York (NY), Columbia (SC) and other cities here.

See photos below from events coast to coast.


“Culture is the widening of the mind and of the spirit.” 

— Jawaharlal Nehru

 

Source: Culture Is . . .

Celebrating Black Philanthropy Month and Our Collective History

SOURCE | Re-Blog from Philanthropy New York: Celebrating Black Philanthropy Month and Our Collective History

Yvonne L. Moore of Moore Philanthropy says she and Black colleagues share the deeply frustrating experience of having decisions, grant recommendations and analyses consistently questioned, unjustly critiqued and sometimes even undermined. READ MORE

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Black Philanthropy Month: Elevating A Culture of Giving

ELEVATEAugust Is Black Philanthropy Month!  Read all about it here: BPM 2016: Elevating A Culture of Giving

BPM 2016 MAIN BANNER

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Black Philanthropy Month 2016: Elevate Our Culture of Giving

BPM 2016 MAIN BANNER

The arrival of August will mark the start of Black Philanthropy Month (BPM). BPM is a multimedia campaign to inform, involve, inspire and invest in Black philanthropic leadership. As a campaign, BPM 2016 will comprise activities—online and in communities—to inspire people to give in conscious and more strategic ways.  This year’s focal concept and theme is Elevating A Culture of Giving. 

‘Our giving has always been seed capital for community change’

Jackie Copeland-Carson, PhD, founder of Black Philanthropy Month, notes, “Our giving has always been seed capital for community change. But with the pressing challenges facing us today, we need to do much more to strengthen our collective giving for the times. BPM 2016 kicks off a year-long revival of our community philanthropy. Black giving matters and we hope communities everywhere can join us to transform our future.”

During August and continuing throughout the year, the blog will highlight news, BPM Featured Events and more from communities across the country and globally.

‘Exercising the power of Black giving is my passion’

Tracey Webb, founder of Black Benefactors and former blogger at BlackGivesBack.com says, “Exercising the power of Black giving is my passion, and the stories illuminated every August remind me that there is solidarity and consequently I feel emboldened.”

To prepare for the launch of Black Philanthropy Month, be sure to do the following:

  • “Like” the Facebook page to follow posts and also use #BPM2016 for updates and happenings on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.
  • Go to the Shareables folder on Dropbox.com to download a current media release, social media badges, sample tweets, the BPM Participant Guide, and other items to help you engage with your peers, in your community, and across the world.
  • Use social media to tell us what you have planned for August, why Black giving matters, and how you’ll give during the month. Announce your BPM events via the online form.

‘Giving liberates the soul of the giver’

Revelations on philanthropy are the focus of Maya Angelou’s written piece, “The Sweetness of Charity”. Ushered in with Black Philanthropy Month is a spirit of generosity and a time for reflection. Below is a selection of readings to help inform your philanthropic thinking and practice. These poems, essays and short stories—many recommended by the Center for Civic Reflection—are provided for you to read and ponder personally, to read aloud as an opening or closing piece of a public program, or to focus on in a discussion group. Elevate your giving with reflection.

“The Sweetness of Charity” by Maya Angelou

“Last Will And Testament of Mary McLeod Bethune” by Mary McLeod Bethune

“The Lovers of the Poor” by Gwendolyn Brooks

“Rich Aunt” by Valaida Fullwood

“What I Learned from My Mother” by Julia Kasdorf

“The Drum Major Instinct” by Martin Luther King, Jr.

“The Four Traditions of Philanthropy” by Elizabeth Lynn and D. Susan Wisely

“The Lamb and the Pinecone” by Pablo Neruda

“When Giving Is All We Have” by Alberto Rios

“Full Circle” by Quentin Talley

“Truth Be Told” by Ava Wood

What informs your giving? Share your response on Facebook and Twitter using #BPM2016.

Black Philanthropy Month is generously supported by BPM 2016 Campaign Partners: The California Endowment, The California Wellness Foundation and The Give Black Foundation, along with a host of Institutional Sponsors.

Thank you,

#BPM2016 Architecture Team


Re-blogged from BPM365 via BlackPhilanthropyMonth.com. Proud and excited to be a part of the BPM Architecture Team, along with Jackie Copeland-Carson and Tracey Webb! — VF

Come to Dinner with Me in Charlotte July 28th!

Afroculinaria

ABOUT THIS EVENT

Menu:

Okra Soup

Mary Randolph’s Yeast Rolls

Fried Chicken

Madeira Ham

Cornbread Kush

Sautéed Greens

Peach Cobbler

Food for thought and for your palate with Culinary Historian Michael W. Twitty

The Harvey B. Gantt Center is a proud partner with Duke Energy in presenting the new Heritage & History series. This program series features nationally noted artists and scholars who are preserving Black culture through an array of disciplines. In hosting each culture keeper, the Gantt Center invites public participation in special events and experiences that illuminate important stories and engage audiences.


Presenting Sponsor

Headquartered in Charlotte, Duke Energy is the largest electric power holding company in the United States. Its regulated utility operations serve approximately 7.4 million electric customers located in six states in the Southeast and Midwest. Visit Duke Energy’s websitehere.

#Gantt2016 #FeastOnCulture

BUY Ticketshere!

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hand. me. that.

Truth Hand

A word cloud composed from the poem Truth Be Told, holding imagery and verse that remind me and ground me in unsettling times

— VF

Sunny

When sun shines on me
rays from its stare melt my cares
and peace is present.

VF photo collage

Wishing you peace on Independence Day!

Feast on Culture!

Food for thought and for your palate with Culinary Historian Michael W. Twitty

Michael Twitty Image_IMG_6500My work continues with the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African American Arts + Culture on its Heritage & History series. Next month, the Center will host Michael W. Twitty, a 2016 TED Fellow, chef and independent scholar on African American food, folk culture and culinary traditions of the African Diaspora.

Michael first came to my attention in 2013 while watching the documentary “The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross” with Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Soon after, I began following Michael’s popular blog Afroculinaria.com, the first website devoted to the preservation of historic African American foods and food ways. He’s a living history interpreter who “re-constructs early Southern cuisine as prepared by enslaved African American cooks for tables high and low.”

As a Southerner, ridiculous foodie, descendent of enslaved African Americans and forever-eager student of a long line of housekeepers and cooks who were my elder kin, I found Michael’s work fascinating and resonant. A seasoned presenter, Michael has delivered talks and cooking demonstrations at the Smithsonian, Monticello, Williamsburg and Oxford. His public talks, writing and meals stir dialogue about Black identity, the South, the African Diaspora, cultural appropriation and the racial legacy of America.

I reached out to Michael about 18 months ago to inquire what it would take to bring him to Charlotte. Admittedly, I fanned-out when he responded immediately and personably to my email. My giddiness increased when we spoke by phone and synched up our thinking to create a vision for a Charlotte food event. We gravitated to the idea of a talk and tasting of authentic recipes, informed by WPA narratives of formerly enslaved people from the Carolinas. Wow! Both my mouth and my eyes watered at the thought.

After much anticipation, Michael will present in Charlotte this summer as part of the Gantt Center’s Heritage & History program. It is a programming series that I’ve had the joy of conceiving, naming and shaping to spotlight nationally noted artists and scholars who are preserving Black culture through an array of disciplines and media. In hosting each culture keeper, the Gantt Center invites public participation in special events and experiences that illuminate important stories and engage audiences. Duke Energy is the Center’s sponsoring partner on the series. The inaugural Heritage & History program took place in March.

Michael’s talk will take place at Founders Hall, located at 100 North Tryon Street, smack dab in the center of Charlotte—the city’s historic heart and centuries-old trading crossroad. The irony of the event’s venue isn’t lost on me. How can you not marvel at the juxtaposition of a program centered on the antebellum stories and foods of enslaved Black cooks relegated to lowly hovels and a venue characterized by an expansive vaulted atrium, marble floors and 21st-century modernity. Further, Founders Hall sits in Charlotte’s tallest building—headquarters of the nation’s largest bank. The symbolism and seeming incongruity are remarkable yet representative of the curiously tangled American story. I trust the Ancestors will smile upon us as we remember them, learn about their lives and lift up their stories in one of our grandest  and most relevant places.

On Thursday, July 28, please come meet and experience Michael. And you can sample food of our collective ancestral roots. Buy your tickets here.

— VF

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Michael W. Twitty and me